Tag Archives: challenges

What Makes Them Tick? (Video)

Part of college is finding what it is that  “makes you tick.”

The video below is an insight of what makes four first-generation students tick. They’re in college not only to pursue a higher education that their parents couldn’t but also to find a career that they will enjoy. I asked each of them what it is that makes them tick about their career path relating to their major. Each described what it is that makes them “tick.”

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From My Point of View

Visiting Cal Poly SLO. Photo by Virginia Nunez.
Visiting Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. Photo by Virginia Nunez.

If you’ve read the “About” section on this blog you know that I myself am a first-generation and low-income college student.

A goal of mine for this blog is to focus on the experiences of other students on each post but this post will be an exception because as a change I will be talking about my experience. I will touch on several past posts and add how I personally relate to the topic.

Continue reading From My Point of View

EOP at Cal Poly SLO (Slideshow)

College can be a scary and confusing place. Having a support system on campus is important. At Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and at every other California State University there is the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP). EOP is under Cal Poly’s Student Academic Services which provides educational resources to students that can help them succeed.Students can apply for EOP after they finish applying to the CSU(s) (including Cal Poly SLO) of their choice . Part of the criteria to be eligible for EOP is to be an “educational disadvantaged student” or first-generation student and be low-income.

Once a student is accepted into the EOP program then they become connected with their EOP advisor. It helps them transition from high school to college and gives them support throughout their college years. There are six advisors, one for each college at Cal Poly.  The slideshow below gives an insight look at a day in Cal Poly’s EOP offices.

Click on the first picture to start the slideshow.

“We want to ensure that the student does not just get admitted but are successful so they are able to obtain their degree. As advisors we really care about our students we want to ensure that they are utilizing us not just for academic advising but sometimes if there’s personal issues it’s always good for them to know that there will always be someone that will be able to listen to you” – Jose Millan, EOP Academic Advisor for the College of Engineering.

“As a first-generation student it is even harder because you don’t know what to expect so having someone you can come to with any question is the best part of EOP.” – Katie Ellis, EOP Academic Advisor for the College of Liberal Arts said.

Applying For a Future

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Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Administration Building. Photo by Melissa Nunez.

The college application season is always a busy and nerve wrecking one. Deadline after deadline and essay after essay have to be done. It is a lot of work and responsibility. First-generation students do not have a big help system at home because they are the first in their family to go to college. Unlike second or third generation students, their parents do not know what the application process is like. Which can cause the students to struggle with the application process and have to rely on outside help.

“The college application process can be ambiguous and scary. These students don’t have parents that are helping them read through all the fine print and multiple number of documents and emails that are coming their way,” Maria Arvizu-Rodriguez, a Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Educational Opportunity Program counselor said.

Q&A with Cal Poly SLO First-Generation Students

  1. How was the college application process like for you?
  2. What was the support and/or resources that you had?
  3. What is your advice for students who will be the first in their family?

Alvaro Perez, First-Year, Aerospace Engineering major

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Alvaro Perez. Photo by Melissa Nunez.
  1. “My parents didn’t know there was such thing as going through the college application process. They didn’t know you had to apply for financial aid or just how college works. Once I got acceptance letters my parents tried to convince me to stay in Sacramento. They didn’t understand why I wanted to go five hours away to San Luis Obispo.”
  2. “I was in programs in high school that helped first-generation students apply to college, fill out the applications and the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). My brothers and sisters were a big support. My counselor would have workshops once a week since the beginning of my senior year during a one hour slot time. I didn’t do it at home because I didn’t know what to do, how to write it or what they were actually asking for.”
  3. “Apply everywhere, don’t let the college application process scare you away. Just apply to where you want to go. If you really want to do it, then do it. Look for resources cause there is at least one program that will help first generation students with the application process.”
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Magali Silva. Photo by Melissa Nunez

Magali Silva, First-Year, Economics major

  1. “My mom would throw away my college mail. My parents think it’s a waste of time for me to come to college. They think I should be working and supporting them.”
  2. “My avid teacher would make me do my college applications homework style. I started the college application process my junior year and I applied to nine colleges. Family wise the only support I have is my brother, he is the only that wants me to be here. My avid teacher and my brother were my main support.”
  3. “Don’t care about other people’s opinions. It’s your life, you’re going to have to deal with it and they are going to get over it eventually. So if you want to go to college, go to college.”
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Rachel Scales. Photo by Melissa Nunez.

Rachel Scales, First-Year, Modern Languages and Literatures major

  1. “I had no idea what made a school a good fit or a bad fit, or how to go about applying for financial aid, or what to do as a major. Like, nobody knows how to do this, and you’re trying to crack the code.”
  2. “I contacted the schools I was interested in, like, ten times a week with questions. A couple of the schools actually started knowing me. For financial aid help, my social worker hooked me up with the Independent Living Skills Program (ILSP) in San Francisco, and they were fantastic. They helped me find scholarships, and they’d go over scholarship essays with me, and they helped me do the FAFSA.”
  3. “Don’t be deterred from applying to certain schools. It’s not as hard to get into schools as you think. I thought I wouldn’t get in to half my schools. Apply to schools you don’t think you’ll get in to. Pretty much every school has fee waivers available, too, so no worries.”

Once the college application season is over, the time comes to choose where to go. These students chose Cal Poly SLO.  The transition can be difficult because it is a very unfamiliar territory.

Arvizu-Rodriguez recommends support programs similar to the Summer Institute program at Cal Poly that provide transition assistant from the minute they are admitted till the end of their first year.

The opportunities and the help is out there for first-generation college students. It is a matter of finding it and doing what is best for them.

Important links for when applying to college:

The Struggle is Real

Image of Central Library of Vanderbilt University via Wikipedia and used here with a Creative Commons license.
Image of Central Library of Vanderbilt University via Wikipedia and used here with a Creative Commons license.

The road to college can be a tough one. An article in The Atlantic touches upon how difficult it can to be the first in the family to attend college and an article on Cleveland.com talks about the financial challenge for low-income students.

Even though college is new to any first-time freshman, adjusting to it is more difficult for a first generation, low income student. This can be for a few reasons:

  • struggling with social integration
  • academically behind
  • live at home or off-campus
  • financially challenged

Being a first generation student comes with challenges. Their help system is smaller than those who are of second or third generation. They face more financial challenges because they are of a low income.

Going to a public high school doesn’t put out in the open the challenges students have except academic based challenges But in college the challenges for first-generation students can be more noticeable. Students from low-income backgrounds are not as well off as their college peers who are second, third generation or of a higher income. Because of the difference it is harder to connect and be social with peers. That leads to trying to find a niche, people with similar backgrounds.

The expenses that come with college are harder to fulfill. Access to a college education is now not difficult to attain but the costs are a bigger barrier for a first-generation, low-income student. They need help to make their education more affordable.

The challenges can pose a threat to their possibility of  graduating.

Organizations like One Goal focus on helping first-generation students get to graduation.

The opportunities and the support is there but the challenges are harder to overcome. Mentoring, college programs and organizations can help students overcome those challenges and make it more possible for them to graduate.

Hola!

First-generation students studying in the Summer Institute study room at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo's Kennedy Library. Photo by Melissa Nunez.
First-generation students studying in the Summer Institute study room at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo’s Kennedy Library. Photo by Melissa Nunez.

Welcome to First-Generation! This blog will touch a variety of topics relating to first-generation college students.

Who is a first-generation college student?

“A first-generation college student is defined as a student whose parent(s)/legal guardian(s) have not completed a bachelor’s degree at a four-year college or university.” – Chapman.edu

The college experience can be different for first-generation college students. Starting from the application process to learning the ropes of college.

The content on this blog will be similar to that on I’m First and First Generation Student.

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Cal Poly San Luis Obispo’s University Union. Photo by Melissa Nunez.

The look of this blog will be inspired from blogs with a simplistic font, centered post layout and nice visuals.

I am currently a first-generation college student at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. The stories featured here will have insight from other first-generation college students at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. The stories will also include a persepective from faculty who are familiar with the struggles of first-generation college students and support those on campus.

Keep checking in every week to see how the college experience is different for those who are first in the family.